The relationship between diversity training, organizational commitment and career satisfaction.

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between employees’ perceptions of diversity training (DT) existence and effectiveness with organizational commitment (OC), and career satisfaction (CS). Design/methodology/approach – The analyses in this paper utilize survey data collected between 2006 and 2007 from over 11,000 managers, professionals, and executives working in nine large organizations in corporate Canada. The survey included questions about employees’ perceptions of their work experiences and outcomes and their organizations’ diversity practices. Comparisons of means as well as multivariate regression analyses were undertaken. Findings – The paper shows that employees who perceived DT to be effective were significantly more committed to their organizations and more satisfied with their careers than employees who perceived DT to be ineffective or non-existent. Research limitations/implications – The paper examines the linkages between DT, OS, and CS based on survey responses from managers, professionals, and executives. Findings may therefore not be applicable to entry level employees. Practical implications – DT, and in particular when viewed by employees to be effective, increases employees’ OC and CS, which are associated with loyalty, lower turnover and higher employee engagement. Originality/value – The paper found that employees’ OC and CS are highest when they perceived DT to be effective. Factors associated with OC and CS are explored based on employees’ perceptions of the availability and effectiveness of DT.

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